Archive

Seminal fluid

2016-06-11 18.53.54

Just emerging from a busy teaching period, it was as ever a pleasure this year to welcome first another enthusiastic group of Bachelor students to our upper-level undergraduate course on “Key Concepts in Evolutionary Ecology”, followed by another excellent set of Master students taking our module “Evolution of Behaviour”. The Master module – which Klaus Reinhold and I teach together – focuses on bushcricket behavioural ecology, and our aim is to try to pack in the full scientific “experience”, from developing a hypothesis and designing an experiment to test it, then actually conducting the experiment and analysing the results, through to finally presenting the research in a paper and oral presentation (all in 6 weeks!). The highlight is a two-week trip to central Greece, where we conduct the experiments the students have designed in the field. It was a brilliant trip this year, undoubtedly enhanced through various guest researchers joining us (thanks all!). Today is the last day of the module, and I’m very much looking forward to the students’ presentations of their work in the final symposium this afternoon.

A few other recent lab developments:

First, a very warm, if slightly belated, welcome to Ekin Demir, an intern student studying in Ankara who is joining the lab over the summer. During her visit, Ekin will work together with Bahar, myself and our collaboration partner Claudia Fricke in Münster on a spermatogenesis project.

Second, speaking of Münster, the lab was well represented at the Insect Reproductive Molecules meeting there this week. Well done to Bahar, Michael, Yumi and Ekin for your contributions and thanks very much to Claudia and her team for putting together an excellent meeting (and for inviting us even though we don’t work on insects!). Some fascinating discussion of seminal fluid-mediated effects and various other reproductive phenomena in Drosophila, beetles, snails and flatworms, and a really friendly and open atmosphere (despite all the talk of Brexit in the coffee breaks!).

And finally, my aim of blogging about papers as we publish them has slipped a bit, so to catch up, I’m delighted to report that an experimental evolution study in Macrostomum lignano led by Tim Janicke has just come out in Journal of Evolutionary Biology, plus two review articles. The first is a chapter I wrote together with Lukas Schärer on sex in hermaphrodites for the Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology, and the second is my take on why flatworms are an interesting model group for studying various aspects of sexual diversity, commissioned for a forthcoming special issue of Molecular Reproduction & Development dedicated to Hermaphrodites.

Janicke T, Sandner P, Ramm SA, Vizoso DB, Schärer L (2016)
Experimentally evolved and phenotypically plastic responses to 
enforced monogamy in a hermaphroditic flatworm
Journal of Evolutionary Biology. http://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12910

Schärer L, Ramm SA (2016) 
Hermaphrodites
The Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Vol 2, p. 212-224. 
http://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800049-6.00160-8

Ramm SA (2016)
Exploring the sexual diversity of flatworms: Ecology, evolution,
and the molecular biology of reproduction.
Molecular Reproduction and Development. http://doi.org/10.1002/mrd.22669

 

Photo: our field site in Paleokastro, central Greece.

 

Huge congratulations to Yumi Nakadera, just awarded a Humboldt Research Fellowship to study the adaptive dynamics of seminal fluid in snails. The project will allow Yumi to continue developing her independent research programme over the next two years; it will be hosted in my lab here in Bielefeld, with collaboration partners in Amsterdam and Rennes.

Photo: the great pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis (Public domain, via Wikipedia).

photo-1433065213062-cf35c7077f90

This year’s edition of Advances in the Study of Behavior will be published shortly, to which Paula Stockley and I have contributed an in-depth review of male adaptations to sperm competition in rodents. The review pulls together many of the different research strands we have ourselves been working on over the past several years, covering aspects such as copulatory behaviour, sperm production, sperm allocation, sperm quality, seminal fluid and genitalia, as well as the wider context of sperm competition studies by considering topics such as cryptic female choice, sexual conflict and multivariate selection and trade-offs. We argue that allied to traditional behavioural and morphological studies, recent molecular and genome-based approaches are transforming our understanding of traits that contribute to male competitive fertilization ability, closing the gap between genotypic and phenotypic perspectives on their adaptive evolution.

Hopefully the review will be a useful synthesis of where we’ve got to with respect to understanding sperm competition in this important vertebrate model group, and can serve as a guide to where we need to go next. The advance online version can be found here.

Integrating perspectives on rodent sperm competition.
Ramm SA, Stockley P (2016)
Advances in the Study of Behavior 48, in press. 
DOI: 10.1016/bs.asb.2016.02.003

Photo credit: Joad Hughes, via Unsplash.